No Go

Just got off the phone with Rocky’s owner.  She rode him “one last time” and realized she couldn’t part with him.  I guess I understand… I was wondering how anyone could part with such a handsome horse in the first place.

Well, moral of the story is:  Don’t count your horses until they’re in the barn!

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Satisfaction

I LOVE the feeling of marking another project off the list!

And this one had been nagging at me for a long time.  Well, let’s see…we got the fence up in April, bought the lumber in July and just stared at it for a few weeks.  It took us three separate sessions and working past dark tonight, but we got ‘er done!

My husband and I are really getting good at working on these projects together.  He’s the muscle and I’m the “measure twice, cut once” kind of gal.  We balance each other well!

Now to install a couple of strands of electric along the fence line, cage off the bees their own sector and build a small run-in and we’ll be ready for goats.  You didn’t think we were going to all this trouble just for a couple dozen chickens, did ya?  😉  Although it does rest my mind to know the dogs can’t pick them off so easily now.

I am also getting a new horse.  Hopefully we can go pick him up tomorrow.  I was looking for a new pasture mate for my gaited paint gelding, Journey.  This new horse, Rocky, is a 12-year-old Tennessee Walker gelding.  He’s on rehab from an injury, but is cleared for light work and to build up from there.  He was free to a good home because his current owners needed to downsize.  I will definitely post lots of pictures of him when we get him home.  Here’s a picture that was forwarded to me. 

Isn’t he a looker!  I’m debating whether or not to change his name.  If you’ve got any ideas for a good name for this handsome boy, feel free to leave them in the comments section!

Now this is Journey (the Paint) and Lily, his old pasture mate (also a Tennessee Walker).  This picture was taken in October of last year.  I’ve had Journey since he was a colt.  I won him at the County Fair on a one dollar raffle ticket in 2002.  He’s a good boy and I love him.  I hope that Ava can ride him in the Fair here in a few years.

 

Now the horses don’t live here on the One Sunny Acre.  They live on my Dad’s 44-acre farm 10 minutes down the road.

 

 

Horsey Neighbors

It’s always been high on my wish list to be able to look out of my kitchen window and see horses grazing in the field beyond.  Originally this dream came with the desire to have enough acreage to pasture my own horse.  With only one acre to our property, my gaited paint gelding, Journey, is kept on my Dad’s farm 10 minutes down the road.

We got some new neighbors last April and recently they brought in their four horses, which I will enjoy watching in the 13 acre field below our house almost as much as if they were my own.  I get to enjoy them without having to pay for their feed and care, which sounds like a good deal to me!

This is their little herd of four mares.  It’s been raining a lot lately, but I ran out the door with my camera when I saw they were close enough to the fence line to get some good shots.

Horsey Neighbors

I haven’t asked their names yet, but will when I get a chance.  I have a hard time remembering the kids’ names anyway, so I don’t want to seem overly interested in the horses.  Ha.

This dappled gray mare is my favorite.  Aside from being very pretty, she is also the most friendly (and dominant) of the four.

Dapple Gray Mare

This mare could be the twin sister of my own horse, Journey, except that she is probably 2 hands taller than him.  Her markings are brown and his are black, but the placement is very similar.

Journey's Twin Sister

They also have four cattle as well.  Here are the two steers.  (Don’t get attached to them.  They won’t be around long.  I will call them Cheeseburger and Steak’um.)

Steers

Here is a cow with her calf.

Cow and Calf

My chickens came running up to the juncture of the two fence lines as if to say, “hey, we’re cute too! ”  (Or quite possibly, “hey, where’s our treat?”)

Laying Flock, Summer '10

The grass is always greener on the other side!  I don’t know how long this fence will hold up to four horses stretching over and frequently scratching their rumps on it.  I think they’re going to want to run a strand of electrobraid.  It was originally fenced for a couple of dairy goats and for use as a rabbit pen for training the beagles the original owner raised.  The field is very overgrown and brushy and it will work great for the goats my neighbors are planning to get to help clear it.  I think they are getting “fainting goats”.  I’ll get pictures of those too when they arrive.

Grass is Greener...

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